Poor Posture

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | February 27th, 2019

Your posture plays an important role in your overall health.  Poor posture leads to chronic strain and discomfort. “Upper crossed syndrome” describes poor posture that results from excessive tightness in your shoulders and chest with weakness in your neck and mid-back.  This combination forces your shoulders to roll inward and your head to project forward.

To help understand how upper crossed syndrome causes trouble, think of your spine as a telephone pole and your head as a bowling ball that sits on top.  When the bowling ball is positioned directly over the top of the upright post, very little effort is required to keep it in place. If you tip the post forward and the ball begins to roll over the edge of the post, significantly more effort would be required from the muscles trying to hold it there.  This effort results in chronic strain of the muscles of your neck and upper back.

The chronic strain is uncomfortable and may also lead to neck pain, upper back pain, headaches, TMJ pain, and ultimately- arthritis. This postural problem is exceptionally common in computer workstation users.  Correction of this problem is accomplished by stretching the tight muscles, strengthening weak muscles, and modifying your workstation.

“Lower crossed syndrome” is poor posture that results from excessive tightness in your lower back and hip flexor muscles with weakness in your abdominal and buttock muscles.  Patients with lower crossed syndrome often have a “sway back.” Patients who sit for prolonged periods of time are at greater risk of lower crossed syndrome.

This postural problem commonly leads to painful conditions involving the back or hips.  Successful treatment of lower cross syndrome involves stretching excessively tight muscles, strengthening weak muscles, taking frequent breaks from sitting, and modifying your workstation to be more user friendly.

Our treatment options:

Spinal, hip, and shoulder adjustments

Electrical stimulation or spinalator

Muscle work and stretching

Exercises

Kinesiology Taping

Information Organized by ChiroUp.com

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